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cease-fire between israel and hamas militants brokered by the u.s. government and egyptian president morsi. it is less than 24 hours old. there is deep mistrust. civilians on both sides hoping the agreement will bring a permanent end to the deadly air strikes and rocket fire. in gaza with the i have latest, eamon, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. for the first time in nine days the people of gaza were able to go about their business as usual in a place that usually is not very normal. so, for the first time they were able to wake up today after cease-fire declared last evening and shops and stores reopened people going back to their homes. throughout this conflict 9,000 or so palestinians were displaced from their homes. they took up shelters in u.n. schools. today for the first time able to go back, survey damage in some of the areas and try to get their lives back to normal. in gaza city, tens of thousands of supporters of hamas and other palestinian factions that have been fighting over the past nine days came out to the streets in what is described as a victory rally. the
, the u.s. embassies in tanzania responsibled. susan rice is certainly feeling heat over that role and security issues about those embassies. she was the assistant secretary of state for african-americans within the clintoned a hin strags at that time. so what is your response to those attacks of susan rice calling those incidents into question present day? >> well, assistant secretary of africa handles policy towards africa. policy towards kenya. towards south africa. sudan. an assistant secretary is not intimately involved with security. and in this case it was terrorist attack. yes, she's aware of some of the issues, but that's not her direct responsibility. she's worried about american policy. at the time we were dealing with a lot of issues in south africa in the c ochlco this. congo, a number of piece keeping operations. i'm not saying she shouldn't be aware of security issues, but this is not a matter that a policy person directly has responsibility. so it's unfair to target her on those issues, also. >> always great to have you on. >>> and make sure to tune into andrea mitc
and the police, that took place outside the u.s. embassy. riot police there fired tear gas and rubber bullets to try to keep the crowds at bay. one of the central issues of the protesters behind me is that since the end of the revolution, egypt's police force has not been reformed. many of the senior officers are still in positions of power that has led to them continuing many of the brutal tactics that they used under the mubarak era. and today, the people behind me have gathered demanding a few important changes. one, they want president morsi to rescind the decree that he issued on thursday that gave him absolute powers, but more importantly, they want egypt's constitutional assembly. they want writing a new constitution to be more inclusive and reflect egypt's pluralistic viewpoints. the people behind me are the opposition. they have been dormant, haven't been unified. today, many of egypt's more powerful, secular liberal opposition forces have united for the first time. these numbers are unprecedented for them. and i think they are sending from what they're telling me, at least, they're
for a global perspective is former united states senator george mitchell who served as the u.s. special envoy for middle east peace from 2009 to 2011. sir, welcome. we are awfully glad to have you here. let's talk about egyptian president mohammed morsi who played the critical role. he is facing protests in his own country because he's trying to expand and have further reaching powers. do you see this as a power grab? that he's riding on something of a success? >> churchill once said democracy is the worst possible form of government except for anything else that's been tried by human beings. as senate majority leader, faced with constant delay, frustration, filibustering, i often thought, boy, i would like to be king for a day and cut through all of this. democracy is tough. it's messy and morsi is finding that out. i don't think that what he did was right, and i don't think it will hold. >> with regard to what he's doing now by ordering some retrials in terms of hosni mubarak and his cabinet, what might that do to the situation there? do you worry that would have inflaming factions there? >
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